Quick Answer: Why Is White Chocolate Called Chocolate?

White chocolate doesn’t qualify as genuine chocolate because it doesn’t contain chocolate solids (a.k.a.

cocoa powder).

White chocolate is typically made from a blend of cocoa butter, milk solids, sugar, milk fat and lecithin — a fatty emulsifier that holds it all together.

Why is white chocolate allowed to be called chocolate?

Technically, white chocolate is not a chocolate—and it doesn’t really taste like one—because it doesn’t contain chocolate solids. When cocoa beans are removed from their pods, fermented, dried, roasted, cracked open, and their shells discarded, what results is a nib.

What makes white chocolate different?

Whereas milk and dark chocolate are produced from various proportions of the non-fat part of the cocoa bean, white chocolate contains no cocoa solids whatsoever. Instead, white chocolate is made from cocoa butter, a pale yellow edible vegetable fat which has a cocoa aroma and flavour.

Why was white chocolate invented?

Because it has no cocoa liquor, white chocolate has very little caffeine compared to regular chocolate. White chocolate was invented by the Nestlé company in Switzerland. White chocolate contains cocoa butter, milk solids, sugar, lecithin and flavorings (usually including vanilla).

Why is it called chocolate?

The word “chocolate” is derived from the Classical Nahuatl word chocolātl. Baking chocolate, also called bitter chocolate, contains cocoa solids and cocoa butter in varying proportions, without any added sugar.